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Lectures

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Background

Lectures by noted experts and scholars are held frequently on a wide range of subjects related to the Society's objectives and the interests of its members and non-members.

Lectures are usually held at The Siam Society, 131 Asoke Montri Rd, Sukhumvit 21. Unless otherwise stated, they are in English.

Admission is free for Siam Society members, members’ spouses and children, and all students showing valid student ID cards. Other people are asked to make a donation of B200. For more information, please contact Khun Arunsri. Office hours: 9:00am–5:00pm Tuesday–Saturday (except holidays).

Lectures are recorded in high-quality digital video (DVD format). If you cannot come to a lecture, you can order a DVD of a lecture for 300 baht. Please call Khun Arunsri.

The Society welcomes speakers to talk on subjects of a scholarly nature in conformity with the principles and objectives of the Siam Society, investigating the arts and sciences of Thailand and neighbouring countries. Guidance>>>


The Siam Society is deeply grateful to the James H.W. Thompson Foundation for its generous support of the 2016-2017 Lecture Series.

Schedule

24 August 2017 : 7.30 p.m.
A Mauryan–Śunga Period Ringstone: 3rd-1st Century BCE, found in Peninsular Thailand. A talk by Anna Bennett. In October 2014, a finely decorated Śunga ringstone was found by the owner of a sand quarry on the Tha Tapao River on the eastern side of Isthmus region of the Thai peninsula. The ringstone is a characteristic, almost defining object of the Mauryan – Śunga periods of Northern India, where possibly as many as 70 have been recorded from the Punjab, eastwards along the Ganges Valley to Bihar. More>>>

31 August 2017 : 7.30 p.m.
A New Interpretation on the Eastern Limit of Ptolemy’s World Map and its Influence on European Worldview in the Evolution of Southeast Asian Mapping. A talk by Trongjai Hutangkura. The Geography, written in the second century CE by Claudius Ptolemy (c. 100 ce- c. 170 ce), described the Earth’s geography through knowledge from Greco-Roman trade routes. The map India beyond the Ganges presented geographical information stretching from the river’s east bank towards China. More>>>

7 September 2017 : 7.30 p.m.
What’s in a Name? The Status of Dvāravatī Today. A talk by Nicolas Revire. What do we really know about Dvāravatī? Lasting from approximately the sixth to the ninth centuries CE and focused in today’s central Thailand, Dvāravatī in one or another form has been of major concern to Thai and Southeast Asian art historians and archaeologists for over 80 years. More>>>

Previous lectures>>>